How people chose what ebook to read - Part 2

Click Image to Enlarge Image Source: AuthorMarketingClub.com

Infographic - why people buy booksIn my last blog I discussed a poll conducted by USA TODAY and Bookish, a website designed to help people find and buy books. The poll found that a majority of those surveyed (57%) cited their own opinion of the writer's previous work as the major factor in creating interest in a particular book for them. Opinions of a relative and friend (publishers call that "word of mouth") came in second at 43%. Lower on the list of major factors: professional reviewers and other writers (each 17%), the book cover (16%) and Internet opinions by non-professionals (10%).

This week I wanted to share with you the results of another recent survey by ebookfairies which  confirms many of the USA today survey's results. The ebookfairies survey was conducted from June 1-30, 2013, via Survey Monkey, and as many as 2,951 people replied to most of the 44 questions formulated by more than a dozen authors.

Some of the more relevant information from the survey include:

  • Most of the readers surveyed didn't care who publishes a book or pay very little attention to who the publisher is. Judging by these results, it’s probably safe to assume the author name is selling more books these days than the publisher name.
  • Retail reviews, such as those found on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and other retail sites, are the most important reviews in today’s environment. This is different from the USA Today poll which found that only 10% of responses valued the opinions of non-professionals.
  • If an author only has time for one social media platform, choose Facebook. It’s where the readers are and it’s where they’re looking for their favorite authors.
  • Author endorsements don’t matter as much as industry insiders think they do. Most readers don’t care about them.
  • More than half don’t care how much a book costs if they want it badly enough. Most expect to pay $4.99 for a full-length novel (80,000 words or more) and between $0.99 and $1.99 for a 25,000-word novella.
  •  Readers are still somewhat leery about buying self-published books from unknown authors, whereas they are more than willing to buy books from self-published authors who are known to them. (Which is hardly surprising given the importance of word of mouth identified in the USA Today poll).
  • Readers pay very little attention to book trailers.

The last point is an interesting one as we're looking at trialling a book trailer for our next release. If anyone has any comments about any of the above points I'd love to hear from you.

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